Read Encounters: My Life with Nixon, Marcuse, and Other Friends and Teachers by Paul Edward Gottfried Online

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"Paul Gottfried has spent a lifetime asking politically incorrect questions, untimely questions that have made him more unpopular among some timid "movement" conservatives than among critical theorists, Central European Marxists, and assorted other debating and dining partners. But in Encounters: My Life with Nixon, Marcuse, and Other Friends and Teachers, Gottfried puts p"Paul Gottfried has spent a lifetime asking politically incorrect questions, untimely questions that have made him more unpopular among some timid "movement" conservatives than among critical theorists, Central European Marxists, and assorted other debating and dining partners. But in Encounters: My Life with Nixon, Marcuse, and Other Friends and Teachers, Gottfried puts past political battles aside in order to recount his varied associations and friendships with a host of fascinating figures, including his father, Herbert Marcuse, Paul Piccone, Christopher Lasch, Richard Nixon, and Patrick J. Buchanan." Gottfried's memoir emphasizes the Forrest Gump-like quality of his often accidental relationships with these celebrities and stimulating personalities, the benefits of which were not social or professional but personal. He insists that his life would be of little general interest were it not for the fortuitous encounters that have raised it out of the ordinary. The result is a unique, enthralling narrative that makes a signal contribution to American intellectual history....

Title : Encounters: My Life with Nixon, Marcuse, and Other Friends and Teachers
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781933859996
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 275 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Encounters: My Life with Nixon, Marcuse, and Other Friends and Teachers Reviews

  • Joseph Hirsch
    2019-11-09 20:52

    Paul Gottfried's "Encounters" chronicles his meetings with fellow right-wing culture warriors, like Pat Buchanan or Sam Francis, as is to be expected. The book also highlights his liberal (as the term was used during the Enlightenment) attitude toward people on the opposite end of the political spectrum, like Herbert Marcuse, whom he also met and had the pleasure of sparring against intellectually. Indeed, Gottfried's ability to extract pearls of wisdom from people on the opposite end of the political spectrum is one of his great strengths, as an intellectual, and more specifically, of this book.Peppered throughout the work are heartwarming anecdotes about Gottfried's childhood, involving his father, an industrious emigrant who fled from the Nazis. It is from his father that Dr. Gottfried inherited a lot of his bulldog tenacity, but also his abhorrence of the politics of victimization. All in all, this was a well-written book, filled with descriptions of the conservative professor's encounters with intellectual luminaries, theorists, and philosophers of both the Left and the Right. Gottfried's usual assault on the Neocons continues apace in this work, as is to be expected. The reason I'm giving the book a four, rather than a five star rating, is that sometimes, even though Gottfried has in fact been targeted by his political opponents and has no doubt been denied plum faculty positions due to his heterodox political beliefs, there were times where I thought the author was wallowing in his martyrdom a bit more than was necessary, and the ranting segues sometimes distracted from the central narrative, which was quite compelling.That's a minor complaint against an otherwise brilliant book, by a great thinker of the old guard, Paleoconservative right, though, whose knowledge of everything from German history to Greek antiquity is, as usual, breathtaking.

  • Matt Carpenter
    2019-11-27 12:47

    This is not a normal autobiography in that the author didn't speak much about his early life (besides an opening chapter on his father). Rather it is about his interesting relationships with various men and how they shaped him. Gottfried has an enjoyable writing style, but a big drawback of the book is that you need to already be familiar with Conservative political theory, both in its American and European manifestations to get the full thrust. If you don't have that, several parts of the book (especially the asides) will be hard to follow. But it will motivate you to read the writings of many of Mr. Gottfried's friends, as well as give you a portrait of their habits and thoughts.

  • David
    2019-11-13 15:56

    This is an excellent intellectual autobiography by a unique and very hard to classify conservative scholar. It describes a sadly disappearing world of Central European Jewish intellectuals, American traditionalists, and an intimate look at the political transformations that took place over the author's eventful life.