Read Mandrake the Magician by Lee Falk Phil Davis Online

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Since its inception, the adventure strip Mandrake the Magician has mesmerized its readers and been a publishing success story. Created by Lee Falk in 1934 for King Features Syndicate, it is still flourishing in papers around the globe. Mandrake comic books have been published in the United States, Canada, Australia, Brazil, Colombia, Denmark, El Salvador, Finland, France,Since its inception, the adventure strip Mandrake the Magician has mesmerized its readers and been a publishing success story. Created by Lee Falk in 1934 for King Features Syndicate, it is still flourishing in papers around the globe. Mandrake comic books have been published in the United States, Canada, Australia, Brazil, Colombia, Denmark, El Salvador, Finland, France, Germany, India, Italy, Jamaica, Mexico, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom....

Title : Mandrake the Magician
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780448164731
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 142 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Mandrake the Magician Reviews

  • Ash
    2019-11-10 15:54

    I have read plenty of Mandrake comics during my childhood. However, I don't remember the comic book titles. I want to get hold of these old comics someday and just reread them.

  • Charles
    2019-11-29 19:50

    When I was young Mandrake the Magician was one of my favorite regular comic strips that appeared in our local paper. The phrase, “Mandrake gestures hypnotically” was the cue that made you realize something strange was about to happen. With his powerful companion Lothar, depicted as a semi-literate black man, Mandrake engaged in a series of unusual adventures on Earth and other locations.This book contains the complete set of Mandrake’s first six adventures and they are a bit different from the later ones. His magic is depicted as far more real rather than illusory in these stories. Through it all, Mandrake never loses his cape or top hat, it is the equivalent of his superhero costume. Mandrake debuted in 1934, shortly after the first appearance of another hero, Doc Savage. Both were created in the depths of the Depression, when many people had no money, but they needed the hope and momentary escape that heroes could bring them. Being a comic strip, even the illiterate could generally understand the events in the life of Mandrake.The content and depictions are of course somewhat dated, the dialog occasionally will raise the eyebrow of the more politically correct readership. However, it was Mandrake, a hero with powers that were never precisely determined, yet one where young readers couldn’t wait to read the next installment in the Sunday paper.

  • Lynda
    2019-12-09 14:09

    I had forgotten Lee Falk wrote Mandrake. Always a fun read.

  • Andy
    2019-12-07 14:11

    With both Falk creations Mandrake the Magician and The Phantom, you have to take a lot on faith, more so, I think, with Mandrake, whose magic, illusions and hypnotic powers are never explained. (Neither is his friendship with Lothar, his protector/bodyguard.) Mandrake is a sort of righter-of-wrongs in many of these tales, whether we're at the circus or in Dimension X. Many of its themes repeat themselves, but they're fun and the Phil Davis artwork is impressive. Mandrake the Magician is an important title in the history of newspaper comic strips and deserves your attention.

  • Bart Hill
    2019-11-17 19:08

    A collection of the first six Sunday funnies, plus short biographies of Lee Falk and Phil Davis. These are very fast paced stories that usually ran for 5-6 months each. It's all action and nearly no explanation or character development, surrounding very simple plot(s). I found it odd to have to read the text boxes first, and then read the dialogue. But, this was the infancy of printed comics. Not a vital purchase, even for those whom have an interest in early serials.

  • Federico Kereki
    2019-12-08 20:06

    Very peculiar -- it seems like Lee Falk wasn't sure if Mandrake was an hypnotist/illusionist (whose magic isn't real, and only in the people's minds) or an actual wizard, able to make people float or conjure food out of nothing, among other impossibilities. Over the years Mandrake tended toward the first role, leaving the impossible feats out, but in these stories both kinds of magic appear.